Wednesday, June 13, 2012

Hematuria in children ( part 1)


Background
Hematuria is one of the most common urinary findings that result in children presenting to pediatric nephrologists. Generally, hematuria is defined as the presence of 5 or more RBCs per high-power field in 3 of 3 consecutive centrifuged specimens obtained at least 1 week apart. In the office setting, a positive reaction on the urine dipstick test is usually the first indication of the presence of hematuria. Hematuria can be gross (ie, the urine is overtly bloody, smoky, or tea colored) or microscopic. It may be symptomatic or asymptomatic, transient or persistent, and either isolated or associated with proteinuria and other urinary abnormalities. The role of the primary care physician in the management of a child with hematuria includes the following:
·         Recognize and confirm the finding of hematuria.
·         Identify common etiologies.
·         Select patients who have significant urinary system disease that might require further expertise in either diagnosis or management and referral.

Pathophysiology

The etiology and pathophysiology of hematuria vary. For instance, hematuria of glomerular origin may be the result of a structural disruption in the integrity of glomerular basement membrane caused by inflammatory or immunologic processes. Chemicals may cause toxic disruptions of the renal tubules, whereas calculi may cause mechanical erosion of mucosal surfaces in the genitourinary tract, resulting in hematuria.


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1 Comments:

wadood Aref said...

nice
waiting for next parts

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